Ablation

What is Ablation?

This procedure, also referred to as endometrial ablation, destroys the uterine lining or endometrium. This procedure is performed to treat or control prolonged or heavy uterine bleeding when:

  • Bleeding has not responded to other treatments such as oral birth control.
  • Childbearing is completed.
  • You prefer not to have a hysterectomy.
  • Other medical conditions prevent hysterectomy.

Endometrial ablation can be performed using the following methods:

  • Laser beam (laser thermal ablation)
  • Heat or thermal ablation
  • Electricity using a resectoscope with a loop or rolling ball electrode
  • Freezing
  • Microwaves

Once the procedure is completed, the uterine lining heals by forming scar tissue that reduces and prevents uterine bleeding. This procedure can be done on-site at a doctor’s office or in an outpatient facility and is completed in 45 minutes. A local, spinal, or general anesthesia can be used to alleviate discomfort, and patients can return home the same day. After the procedure you can expect some cramping, nausea, and vaginal discharge lasting anywhere from two days to two weeks.

What are some of the risks with endometrial ablation?

Some of the uncommon risks with endometrial ablation include:

  • Tearing of the uterus opening (cervical laceration)
  • Accidental puncture of the uterus
  • Burns of the uterus or surface of the rectum

Patients should not consider this procedure if they plan on becoming pregnant in the future.

Annual Exams

I just started my cycle; should I reschedule my annual exam?

It is best to reschedule your exam if you are having your period. Your physician performs a Pap test as part of your annual pelvic exam, and to date it is the most effective screening tool for cervical cancer. Hormonal changes that occur during your cycle can make it difficult for the pathologist to interpret the sample. The best time to schedule an annual exam with your physician is the first week after your period, if possible.

Is there anything I need to avoid before my annual exam?

You should avoid vaginal intercourse, or using douching, tampons, vaginal foams and jellies, vaginal inserts, sprays, and deodorants 48 hours prior to the appointment, as these products can affect the accuracy of your sample.

For my appointment, can I fill out any paperwork beforehand?

We have all the necessary forms online for your convenience. To find them, visit the Patient Forms page. Print all necessary forms, fill them out, and bring them with you to your appointment.

Can I see any doctor for my annual exam?

You may request any of our physicians when scheduling an appointment by phone. At OB/GYN of Indiana, we try to accommodate every patient’s schedule and comfort with great care.

I am not able to accompany my teenage daughter to her appointment; what does she need to bring with her to the appointment? And do I need to sign anything in order for her to be seen?

If this is your teenage daughter’s first visit, have her bring a list of all the medications she currently takes, as well as her insurance card and general information. Feel free to contact one of our locations if you have any questions about what your daughter needs.

What is a Pap smear and why do I need one?

A Pap smear or Pap test is a test where a sample of cells is taken from a woman’s cervix and reviewed for abnormalities that indicate cell changes such as dysplasia or cervical cancer.

Do I have to set up an appointment with a doctor, or can I meet with a nurse practitioner?

At OB/GYN of Indiana, our nurse practitioners are trained to provide our patients with the best care. If you have a regular appointment or general question, our nurse practitioners will see to your needs in every area they can, except surgeries and emergency procedures.

At what age do I need to start annual examinations?

You should start seeing a physician for your annual examination when you become sexually active. But regardless of when you become sexually active, you should begin annual examinations when you are 21 years old.

What can I expect at an annual appointment?

If you are attending your first annual examination with a gynecologist or nurse practitioner, your provider will examine your body for general health, including the breasts, back, and oral and aural cavities. Along with the general check up, your provider will administrate a Pap smear to determine the existence of cancerous or pre-cancerous cells in your cervix. Often, blood work is done as well. Should you have any questions regarding your exam, your provider can answer any questions and provide any details.

Billing

Will I receive a separate bill from the facility or hospital after I have a procedure?

Yes, the hospital or facility is allowed to bill you or your insurance for the portion of the care they provide. It can include anesthesia, supplies, and time spent in the procedure or operating room.

Can I get a self pay discount?

Yes, we do offer a 20% discount for all self pay patients. You should expect the front desk to collect a portion up front, however any remaining balance will be billed after the date of service since we do not always know all of the charges incurred until after the patient has left.

What if I’m out-of-network?

If you are out-of-network you may still have out-of-network benefits. You should check directly with your insurance company for verification.

What do I do if I receive a denial from my insurance on my genetic testing?

Wait for the lab to send you a statement. If you disagree with the patient balance due on the statement, please call the lab for an explanation and mention you are a patient of OB/GYN of Indiana. If this doesn’t resolve your question, please contact the office manager at your physician’s office for further information.

Are you contracted with my insurance?

You can find a list of our contracted insurances on our website, however we always recommend you check directly with your insurance company to verify. Insurance plans often have exclusions or preferences that may affect your out-of-pocket expense. Even if you find out that we are not in-network with your particular plan, you may have out-of-network benefits which may apply.

Why wasn’t I told there would be additional charges?

A physician’s primary objective is to provide their patients with quality healthcare. This may mean that they request additional tests or labs be performed to help diagnose or treat a condition or symptom. While we do make attempts to educate and prepare patients for financial impacts from their care, it is ultimately the patient’s responsibility to ask questions and understand their insurance benefits. If at any time a physician is recommending an additional test or service, the patient has the right to ask questions and decide if they can afford the cost and make arrangements before the service is rendered.

What is a surgery pre-pay and what is included?

Due to the rising costs of health care, many providers have begun collecting from patients in advance of services. The benefit to patients is that they have a better understanding of their out-of pocket-expenses prior to receiving care and have fewer bills to pay after that service has been rendered. In most cases this pre-pay is calculated based on coinsurance since we don’t know if the deductible will be met prior to our claim being received. For patients with very high deductibles, they may be asked to pay a portion of that in advance of service and any overpayment will be reimbursed to the patient after the claim is processed by insurance.

Do you offer payment plans?

We do offer payment plans. Terms are based on individual circumstances and must meet office policy requirements.

How can I pay my bill?

You can pay your bill by mail, over the phone, on our website, or on our patient portal. You can also leave a card on file, or switch to electronic statements and pay on the link provided.

What is an OB pre-pay, and what is included?

Due to the rising costs of healthcare, we attempt to calculate the amount that we expect you will owe once your pregnancy is billed to insurance. This amount, in most cases, is based on a patient’s coinsurance and not on their deductible unless there is a particularly high deductible involved. We ask that this portion be paid in advance of delivery to help reduce the financial burden on our patients post delivery. This pre-pay is only based on the global fee for pregnancy and does not include services billed separately by our offices or the hospital where you deliver. Separately billed services will be billed along the way, and you be asked to pay those balances in addition to the pre-pay. Any portion you may owe above and beyond your pre-pay will be billed to you once we’ve heard back from your insurance. Since we aren’t calculating most pre-pays based on deductibles, if your deductible has not been met by the time you deliver, you should expect to receive a bill.

What is a global maternity fee?

Pregnancy, in most cases, is billed under a global fee. The global fee typically includes 13 routine antepartum visits, delivery, and the 6 week postpartum visit, and is not billed to your insurance until after the delivery. Any lab work, ultrasounds, and additional or unrelated visits are billed separately. If a patient transfers care during pregnancy, or has a change of insurance during that time, then the pregnancy is billed a la carte instead of being billed as a global fee. In this case the visits, delivery, and postpartum care are billed separately to the appropriate provider and insurance.

Can I get my Medicare Wellness visit or Initial Preventive Exam here?

Unfortunately no. Although these visits are covered by Medicare, they are typically provided by a primary care physician as they are much more inclusive than our gyn specific annual exam.

What insurance do you accept?

Check here for a list of insurance providers we accept.

We recommend you check directly with your insurance plan to identify preferences and exclusions that may impact your out-of-pocket costs.

Why am I receiving a charge when I came in for my annual exam? I thought it was supposed to be covered in full by my insurance?

It is true that most insurances cover annual exams at 100% however that is not always the case. Even if your annual exam is covered by your insurance it’s possible that your provider has ordered labs or provided care outside of your annual exam. These services are billed separately and may be applied to your deductible or denied by your insurance depending on your benefits or coverage.

Bone Density Scan

What is the process of a bone density scan?

A bone density scan can detect two things: whether you have thinning bones, and, if you already have osteoporosis, how fast the disease is progressing. The scanner uses beams of very low-energy radiation to determine the density of the bone. The amount of radiation is tiny, about one-tenth of a chest x-ray, and the test is painless and safe. Pregnant women should not get these scans because the baby’s development may be adversely affected by even a low dose of radiation.

How do I know I need a bone density scan?

Many issues such as age, risk, and whether you’ve already been diagnosed with osteoporosis will determine when and how often you should get a bone density scan. The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends the following for bone scans and osteoporosis screening:

  • All women over the age of 65 should get a bone density scan
  • All postmenopausal women under the age of 65, who have the following risk factors for osteoporosis should have a bone density scan:
    • If an immediate family member has a fragility fracture, such as a broken bone from a minor accident that may suggest osteoporosis
    • If you have a history of adult bone fractures
    • If you currently smoke
    • If you’ve ever taken oral steroids for more than 3 months
    • If you weigh under 127 pounds

Contraception

I just started new birth control and I am spotting. Is this normal?

Spotting or minor bleeding between cycles during the first few months of a new birth control is normal. To avoid continued spotting or bleeding, be sure to take the pill at the same time each day. If the spotting increases or bleeding becomes heavier, consult with your physician.

What is an IUD?

An IUD, or Intrauterine Device, is a plastic birth control device shaped like a small T and is inserted into a women’s uterus by a physician. A plastic string is tied to the end of the IUD and hangs from the device through the cervix and the vagina. IUDs prevent fertilization of the egg by damaging or killing sperm and also keep the uterine lining where a fertilized egg would plant from growing. An IUD can be inserted at any time as long as you are not pregnant. Copper IUDs last up to 10 years, and hormonal IUDs last up to 5 years. This insertion procedure takes only a few minutes and your physician can give you local anesthetic if necessary.

What is the best birth control to take?

Every woman is unique with different needs. Therefore, there is no perfect type of contraceptive for every woman to take. Your physician will discuss the different types of birth control and help you decide what fits your needs and your lifestyle.

I missed taking my birth control; what do I do?

There are several questions you need to answer if you missed taking The Pill. First, how many days did you miss? Second, is missing your birth control a regular occurrence? If you missed one or two days, your birth control instructions may tell you to double up for the day or two after. Second, did you have intercourse during the period you didn’t take your birth control? If you did, you may want to conduct a pregnancy test a few weeks after to see if you’re pregnant. We recommend using another form of non-hormonal birth control, such as condoms, until you are able to start your new pack. We also recommend going to your physician if you believe you might be pregnant; your physician can answer any questions you have and help you plan. If you have difficulty taking your birth control every day, your doctor can prescribe another contraceptive you can take less often.

Delivery

How do I know if I am going into early labor?

Early labor is sometimes called “premature labor” or “preterm labor” and can occur before the 37th week of pregnancy. Some of the signs of preterm labor include:

  • Regular contractions or tightening of your uterus, which may or may not be painful, every 10 minutes or more
  • Spotting or bleeding from the vagina
  • Abdominal or menstrual-like cramps
  • Clear, pink, or brown discharge

Contact your physician if you experience any of the above symptoms for further instructions.

Do I have to rotate between all of the doctors during pregnancy? If so, why?

We promote relationships between physicians and their patients, so we do what we can to always set up appointments with your chosen doctor. However, sometimes you may need an emergency appointment when your physician isn’t available to meet with you. If you believe you have an emergency after office hours or on the weekend, we have an answering service that assists with immediately contacting the physician on-call. See the locations section of our website for the nearest office, office hours, and emergency phone numbers.

Can I take a tour of the hospital before I deliver?

Contact your desired hospital to arrange a tour.

Dysplasia and Cervical Cancer

What are the warning signs of Cervical Cancer?

As you grow older your risk for Cervical Cancer increases. Often, a warning sign of Cervical Cancer is abnormal vaginal bleeding.

What are the warning signs of Ovarian Cancer?

Ovarian cancer is a form of cancer that grows on the ovaries. The warning signs of ovarian cancer often are confused for symptoms of other conditions, but they include bloating, pelvic pain, difficulty eating, and frequent urination. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you should let your doctor know so that the right course of action can be taken to help you.

What is a Pap smear and why do I need one?

A Pap smear or Pap test is a test where a sample of cells is taken from a woman’s cervix and reviewed for abnormalities that indicate cell changes such as dysplasia or cervical cancer.

What is dysplasia?

Dysplasia, or cervical dysplasia, is an abnormal, precancerous cell growth found on the surface lining of the cervix, between the uterus and vagina. Cervical dysplasia is common in women under the age of 30, but can develop at any age. It is most associated with sexually transmitted papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Generally, cervical dysplasia has no symptoms and can be discovered during a routine Pap test. With careful follow-up treatment, women with cervical dysplasia can expect successful results, but if it is left untreated or undiagnosed, cervical dysplasia can develop into cervical cancer, though it can take years to fully develop as cancer. If you have a mild form of cervical dysplasia, it may go away without treatment, but your physician may suggest frequent Pap tests to know if you need actual treatment should the dysplasia persist.

How do I lower my risk of getting dysplasia and cervical cancer?

Women can lower their risk of cervical dysplasia by avoiding high-risk sexual activity associated with the HPV infection, such as multiple sex partners and sexual activity at an early age. If you’re sexually active, it is recommended that you use condoms. If used correctly and at every sexual encounter, you can reduce your risk of HPV infection up to 70 percent. Regardless of whether you’re sexually active, screening for cervical dysplasia should begin at age 21.

What is a biopsy?

A biopsy is a procedure that takes a sample of body tissue so that physicians can examine the tissue more closely. Biopsies are usually done to determine the existence of cancer. The most common biopsies are needle biopsies where a needle removes a small piece of tissue to be examined in a pathology lab. Biopsies can be done in a doctor’s office or at a hospital if more advanced imaging machines are needed. Sedation and pain-relief medications can be provided to reduce any discomfort you may have.

Endometriosis

What is an endometrial biopsy?

An endometrial biopsy is a way to look at a small sample of the uterine lining. Your physician can perform a biopsy in several ways:

  • Using a straw-like device to suction a small sample of lining, which is fast and not very painful

Why is an endometrial biopsy necessary?

If a woman is having difficulty getting pregnant, her physician may perform this procedure to see whether a women’s lining can support a pregnancy. The biopsy can also be performed if a woman is experiencing abnormal or heavy bleeding, to check for an overgrowth of the lining called endometrial hyperplasia, or to check for cancer.

What is Endometriosis?

Endometriosis is when uterine lining grows outside the uterus. This does not always cause symptoms and is usually not dangerous, but it can cause pain, abnormal bleeding, and infertility. The lining acts like the uterine lining inside the uterus, building up as it prepares for a fertilized egg, but breaking down when a fertilized egg is not present. However, because endometriosis is outside the uterus, the blood cannot flow out and irritates the lining, sometimes causing scars. Some women do not know they have endometriosis until they are unable to get pregnant. If you believe there is a chance you have endometriosis, do not hesitate to set up an appointment with your physician for an examination.

Fibroids

What are fibroids?

Often referred to as uterine fibroids, these non-cancerous growths can develop on the inside and outside of a women’s uterus. They develop from normal uterus muscle cells that grow abnormally to form benign tumors. At present, no one really understands what causes fibroids to grow, but their growth is linked to estrogen. A woman can develop fibroids after puberty has passed, but fibroids generally affect more women after the age of 30. Fibroids begin to shrink after menopause as the estrogen levels fall.

What are some of the different types of fibroids?

While uterine fibroids are all made up of the same abnormal uterus muscle cells, they are often classified according to their location in the uterus:

  • Myometrial (intramural) fibroids are in the muscular wall of the uterus.
  • Submucosal fibroids grow just under the interior surface of the uterus, and may protrude into the uterus.
  • Subserosal fibroids grow on the outside wall of the uterus.
  • Pedunculated fibroids usually grow outside of the uterus, attached to the uterus by a base or stalk.

Uterine fibroids can range in size from microscopic to several inches across and some weigh as much as ten pounds.

General

What are your office hours?

Our regular office hours are Monday through Friday, 8:30 AM until 4:30 PM but may vary by location. However, if you find you need emergency care, we have physicians on-call in the evenings and on weekends.

What insurance do you accept?

Check here for a list of insurance providers we accept.

We recommend you check directly with your insurance plan to identify preferences and exclusions that may impact your out-of-pocket costs.

Glucola Test

What is a glucola test?

Also known as the oral glucose tolerance test, a glucola test screens for gestational diabetes, a type of diabetes that can develop late in pregnancy. The test is typically given between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy. To take a glucola test, the patient drinks a sweetened liquid called glucola. This liquid is then absorbed into the body, causing the blood glucose levels to rise and allows the physician to test how the body metabolized the liquid through a blood sample.

Do I need to fast before my one-hour glucola appointment?

No, you do not need to fast to take a glucola test.

What food should I eat the morning of my glucola appointment?

You can eat regularly throughout the day. However, avoid anything high in sugar and carbs for 1-2 hours prior to your appointment.

How long will I need to be in the office for my glucola appointment?

The actual test takes at least an hour to conduct, but more than likely will not last two hours.

Hysterectomy

What is a hysterectomy?

Hysterectomies are performed to treat gynecological conditions including cancer, fibroids, endometriosis, uterine bleeding, and childbirth complications. A hysterectomy is defined as the surgically removal of the uterus, but there are many different ways to perform this procedure, and a patient should consider the type of hysterectomy she needs based on the reason for the surgery, as well as the size and position of the uterus. The most common types of hysterectomy surgeries include:

  • Total or complete hysterectomy where both the uterus and cervix are removed.
  • Subtotal or partial hysterectomy where the uterus is removed, but the cervix remains intact.
  • Radical hysterectomy is performed when certain cancers are discovered. This procedure removes the uterus, cervix, ovaries, and other structures that support the uterus, which can include lymph nodes.

What happens in a hysterectomy?

With hysterectomies, the uterus can be removed using any of the following methods:

  • A small incision, about two inches long, just at or above the pubic hairline. This method is sometimes referred to as a mini-laparotomy or “mini-lap.”
  • An incision in the vagina.
  • A large incision made in the lower abdomen.
  • A procedure called laparoscopy. Laparoscopy is the least invasive of all the methods listed. A laparoscope, a small surgical viewing instrument, is inserted through a small incision to gauge the size and position of the uterus. When combined with surgery, it can remove the uterus through an incision in the abdomen (laparoscopic assisted hysterectomy) or vagina (laparoscopic assisted vaginal hysterectomy).

The ovaries can be removed at this time as well. The decision to remove or leave the ovaries is based on what is best for you and your health, which your physician will help you determine.

Mammography

What should I expect during the 3D mammography exam?

3D mammography complements standard 2-D mammography and is performed at the same time with the same system. There is no additional compression required and it only takes a few seconds longer for each view. Adding a few seconds to your exam could save your life!

At what age should I schedule a mammogram?

Always check with your provider first. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends a mammogram every year starting at age 40. 

What is “Tomosynthesis?”

Tomosynthesis is a process that takes multiple images of breast tissue. Digital breast tomosynthesis offers cross-section views of the thin sections of the breast. While 2D screening has been proven to reduce breast cancer mortality, its sensitivity and specificity are limited. 3D tomosynthesis compensates for this by being able to detect malignant lesions that could be obscured by overlapping breast tissue on a standard mammogram. It can also increase specificity by detecting pseudolesions, which can often trigger so-called “false positive” results.

Menopause

How do I know I’m experiencing menopause?

Menopause happens for most women during their forties or fifties, though menopause can begin earlier or later for some women because of illness or other complications. For some, the only symptom is an irregular menstrual cycle that eventually stops completely. However, some women may experience mood swings, a decreased sex drive, hot flashes, sweating, palpitations, headaches, vaginal dryness and soreness, trouble sleeping, and bones thinning. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you may be going through menopause. See your physician for a diagnosis.

Menorrhagia

What is Menorrhagia?

Menorrhagia is a term used to describe extreme heavy uterine bleeding. In many cases, the bleeding may have a known cause such as fibroids, but more often than not, there is no known cause. The threshold for this diagnosis is when a woman loses more than 8mL of blood each menstrual cycle. Today doctors tend to define the Menorrhagia diagnosis by how much it restricts a women’s daily routine. If you experience heavy bleeding that also causes pain, mood swings, disruption to your work life, sexual activity, and other activities, there are treatments available that do not include hysterectomy. Check with your physician about the option that best suits your needs.

What is Ablation?

This procedure, also referred to as endometrial ablation, destroys the uterine lining or endometrium. This procedure is performed to treat or control prolonged or heavy uterine bleeding when:

  • Bleeding has not responded to other treatments such as oral birth control.
  • Childbearing is completed.
  • You prefer not to have a hysterectomy.
  • Other medical conditions prevent hysterectomy.

Endometrial ablation can be performed using the following methods:

  • Laser beam (laser thermal ablation)
  • Heat or thermal ablation
  • Electricity using a resectoscope with a loop or rolling ball electrode
  • Freezing
  • Microwaves

Once the procedure is completed, the uterine lining heals by forming scar tissue that reduces and prevents uterine bleeding. This procedure can be done on-site at a doctor’s office or in an outpatient facility and is completed in 45 minutes. A local, spinal, or general anesthesia can be used to alleviate discomfort, and patients can return home the same day. After the procedure you can expect some cramping, nausea, and vaginal discharge lasting anywhere from two days to two weeks.

Menstruation

Is it normal to bleed between periods?

If you find that you are bleeding outside of your normal menstruation period, then it could be a result of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding. This type of bleeding is usually caused by hormonal problems. Talk to your doctor.

My period has been different. What’s going on?

Your menstruation periods should be regular. If you notice something starting to change in your menstruation like heavier flow, prolonged menstruation periods, or if your cycle is happening at a much more frequent rate, you should contact your doctor and let them know what is going on.

I’m 16 years old and I haven’t started my period. Is something wrong with me?

Girls typically start their first period between the age of 11 and 14, but can start their period as early as 9 and as late as 17. You may have already developed other signs of puberty, such as the development of breasts, widening of hips, and growth of body hair, without starting your period. If you haven’t started your period yet and you are of high school age, you can see your physician to find out what may be affecting your physical development.

OB Ultrasound

Can I have an OB ultrasound before six weeks?

OB ultrasounds are safe at any gestational age, however, the pregnancy cannot generally be seen with an ultrasound prior to 6 weeks. An ultrasound will be ordered by your provider when it is deemed medically necessary.

Ovarian Cancer

What are the warning signs of Ovarian Cancer?

Ovarian cancer is a form of cancer that grows on the ovaries. The warning signs of ovarian cancer often are confused for symptoms of other conditions, but they include bloating, pelvic pain, difficulty eating, and frequent urination. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you should let your doctor know so that the right course of action can be taken to help you.

Pap Smear

What is a Pap smear and why do I need one?

A Pap smear or Pap test is a test where a sample of cells is taken from a woman’s cervix and reviewed for abnormalities that indicate cell changes such as dysplasia or cervical cancer.

What is dysplasia?

Dysplasia, or cervical dysplasia, is an abnormal, precancerous cell growth found on the surface lining of the cervix, between the uterus and vagina. Cervical dysplasia is common in women under the age of 30, but can develop at any age. It is most associated with sexually transmitted papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Generally, cervical dysplasia has no symptoms and can be discovered during a routine Pap test. With careful follow-up treatment, women with cervical dysplasia can expect successful results, but if it is left untreated or undiagnosed, cervical dysplasia can develop into cervical cancer, though it can take years to fully develop as cancer. If you have a mild form of cervical dysplasia, it may go away without treatment, but your physician may suggest frequent Pap tests to know if you need actual treatment should the dysplasia persist.

Polyps

What are polyps?

Polyps are abnormal growths of tissue on a mucous membrane. The most common polyps experienced by women are the cervical variety. These cervical polyps occur in women over the age of 20 and are finger-shaped, red growths found on the cervix. Though we do not yet know the cause of cervical polyps, some studies suggests that it may be from infection or a long-term inflammation, an abnormal response to an increase in estrogen, or a mass of blood vessels in the cervical canal. Polyps can be removed during a pelvic exam, but unless they cause bleeding, discomfort, or have an unusual appearance, they need not be removed.

Pregnancy

I completed an at-home pregnancy test and it reads positive. What is my next step?

There are several steps we recommend to take if you think you’re pregnant. Our offices generally cannot confirm pregnancy, but we recommend scheduling an appointment with an OB educator. We do not schedule labs either–those will be done at their OB education appointment as well.

 

 

Can I have an OB ultrasound before six weeks?

OB ultrasounds are safe at any gestational age, however, the pregnancy cannot generally be seen with an ultrasound prior to 6 weeks. An ultrasound will be ordered by your provider when it is deemed medically necessary.

What is a glucola test?

Also known as the oral glucose tolerance test, a glucola test screens for gestational diabetes, a type of diabetes that can develop late in pregnancy. The test is typically given between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy. To take a glucola test, the patient drinks a sweetened liquid called glucola. This liquid is then absorbed into the body, causing the blood glucose levels to rise and allows the physician to test how the body metabolized the liquid through a blood sample.

Do I need to fast before my one-hour glucola appointment?

No, you do not need to fast to take a glucola test.

What food should I eat the morning of my glucola appointment?

You can eat regularly throughout the day. However, avoid anything high in sugar and carbs for 1-2 hours prior to your appointment.

How long will I need to be in the office for my glucola appointment?

The actual test takes at least an hour to conduct, but more than likely will not last two hours.

What should I do if I get a cold during pregnancy?

Fortunately, colds do not affect the health of your unborn child and will go away on their own. Unfortunately, if you want to rid your body of the symptoms, there are not a lot of options for pregnant women, but there are a few. For nasal congestion, simple saline spray or drops will help you breathe better. We also recommend that you try a humidifier or vaporizer at night while sleeping. Our physicians suggest putting a small amount of Vicks VapoSteam in a cup and placing the cup in the vaporizer to help loosen congestion through the night. Vicks VapoRub is safe to use and works well, but always discuss your symptoms with your physician first before using any medications.

What are my travel restrictions when I am pregnant?

Always consult with your physician before traveling. Be aware of health concerns and preventative measures in the areas you are traveling (including the Zika virus) both here and abroad.

 

Can I go tanning or use spray tans while pregnant?

The effects of dihydroxyacetone (DHA), an ingredient in most spray tans, has not been proven either safe or unsafe. We do know that DHA can be absorbed in your bloodstream either through your skin or by inhaling the spray. In general, it is best to avoid spray tans until they have been specifically proven safe to use while pregnant.

Can I color my hair while pregnant?

At present there are no scientific studies that have conclusively proven that coloring your hair during pregnancy is safe. To ensure the safety of the developing fetus, you may want to wait until after the first trimester. You can also minimize any risk by minimizing your exposure to the dye; it should not touch the skin or scalp, and the salon should be properly ventilated to avoid inhalation. It is best to err on the side of caution and avoid all chemicals during pregnancy if possible to ensure the health of your baby.

Can I use hot tubs or saunas during my pregnancy?

It is best to avoid hot tubs and saunas during pregnancy, because high temperatures can pose some risk to your baby. There is some concern that elevated temperatures of 104 degrees (the temperature of a hot tub) can have adverse effects on a baby’s development, and we advise that bath water should be at a body temperature of 98.6 degrees or only slightly higher.

Is it safe to paint while pregnant?

It all depends on the type of paint you’re using. Some chemicals found in paint such as lead, zinc, and aluminum should be avoided. The most common paint used is latex paint, which is safe; it doesn’t contain solvents and clean up is easy with soap and water. Oil-based paint contains solvents and requires mineral spirits or turpentine for clean up. It is best to avoid contact with oil-based paints if possible and to consider these precautions if you cannot use latex paint:

  • Limit the amount of time you spend exposed to the paint.
  • Provide good ventilation and wear a mask.
  • Wear gloves, long pants, and a long-sleeved shirt to protect absorption through the skin.
  • Do not eat or drink near the paint site to avoid ingesting paint chemicals.

Overall, it is best to avoid painting with oil-based paints until after delivery.

What can I do for constipation when I am pregnant?

Drink plenty of fluids, including at least 80 ounces of water a day and add prune juice to your diet

My dentist wants to take X-rays of my teeth, is this safe during pregnancy?

If your dentist feels x-rays are necessary, be sure to notify them of your pregnancy and have your abdomen shielded appropriately.

What I can do to stop morning sickness?

“Morning sickness,” or nausea and vomiting (NVP), affects up to 80 percent of pregnant women and generally subsides after 16 weeks. Studies have found that some 20 percent of women experience “morning sickness” throughout their entire pregnancy. Herbal remedies, such as vitamin B6 and ginger, as well as acupressure have been used safely with some success. If symptoms make it difficult to perform daily activities, please consult with your physician to find the best remedy for you. Some simple strategies that can assist with easing symptoms include:

  • Try eating small portions every one to two hours. Wait 20 to 30 minutes after eating to have something to drink. Studies have found that eating and drinking separately can ease nausea.
  • Eat what you can tolerate. There are supplements available if you are unable to consume a full meal such as protein bars, pudding, and liquid supplements.
  • Drink at least eight glasses of fluids daily in small amounts. Ice chips and popsicles are easy to tolerate and an option to get those fluids. For your electrolyte balance, sport drinks may help.
  • Try not to swallow excess saliva. Studies show that saliva increases symptoms of nausea and vomiting.

How do I know if I am going into early labor?

Early labor is sometimes called “premature labor” or “preterm labor” and can occur before the 37th week of pregnancy. Some of the signs of preterm labor include:

  • Regular contractions or tightening of your uterus, which may or may not be painful, every 10 minutes or more
  • Spotting or bleeding from the vagina
  • Abdominal or menstrual-like cramps
  • Clear, pink, or brown discharge

Contact your physician if you experience any of the above symptoms for further instructions.

How can I treat a possible yeast infection during pregnancy?

If you think you have a yeast infection, call your physician before self-prescribing an over-the-counter treatment.

How can I treat migraines during pregnancy?

Discuss the situation with your physician before taking any over-the-counter medication.

Is sexual intercourse safe to continue while pregnant?

Sex is safe throughout a normal pregnancy. If you’re having a normal or low-risk pregnancy, sexual intercourse will not harm the baby. The muscular walls of your uterus, your abdomen, and the fluid in the amniotic sac protect your baby. However, while you are pregnant, we recommend that you use positions that relieve any pressure on the abdomen and your baby, especially as you get closer to your due date, and avoid positions that encourage deep penetration. If you have a high-risk pregnancy, one that may be complicated by preterm labor or a risk of a miscarriage, always seek the advice of your physician.

Are hemorrhoids normal during pregnancy? If so, how can I treat them?

It is perfectly normal to have hemorrhoids during pregnancy. Hemorrhoids can develop due to the increased blood in your body and the increased pressure to the blood vessels in your pelvic area. Here are a few suggestions to alleviate discomfort:

  • Eat a diet high in fiber.
  • Drink plenty of liquids.
  • Do not strain during bowel movements.
  • Sit in a warm sitz bath to relieve itching and burning.
  • Apply an ice pack or a cloth soaked in witch hazel to the region.
  • Perform Kegel exercises to improve circulation in the area.

Do I have to rotate between all of the doctors during pregnancy? If so, why?

We promote relationships between physicians and their patients, so we do what we can to always set up appointments with your chosen doctor. However, sometimes you may need an emergency appointment when your physician isn’t available to meet with you. If you believe you have an emergency after office hours or on the weekend, we have an answering service that assists with immediately contacting the physician on-call. See the locations section of our website for the nearest office, office hours, and emergency phone numbers.

Can I take a tour of the hospital before I deliver?

Contact your desired hospital to arrange a tour.

Symptoms

What are some warning signs for Uterine Cancer?

There are several types of Uterine Cancer. Generally speaking, lesions on the uterus appear and you experience abnormal vaginal bleeding with this form of cancer.

What are the warning signs of Cervical Cancer?

As you grow older your risk for Cervical Cancer increases. Often, a warning sign of Cervical Cancer is abnormal vaginal bleeding.

What are the warning signs of Ovarian Cancer?

Ovarian cancer is a form of cancer that grows on the ovaries. The warning signs of ovarian cancer often are confused for symptoms of other conditions, but they include bloating, pelvic pain, difficulty eating, and frequent urination. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you should let your doctor know so that the right course of action can be taken to help you.

What is Vaginitis?

There are a few different forms of Vaginitis, but the condition is experienced in the same way regardless of cause. The vagina is inflamed and can result in discharge, itching, and pain. Talk with your doctor about your symptoms.

I think I’m experiencing sexual dysfunction. Should I tell my GYN?

Sexual dysfunction happens for both females and males. Often times, this means that an individual is having difficulty with sexual desire, arousal, or orgasm. Talking to your doctor is the first step. Sometimes medication is prescribed to help with this dysfunction and simple behavioral techniques can help.

What could be causing pain in my vulva?

Vulvodynia is a chronic pain that occurs at the vulva. The pain may be constant, sporadic, or happen only when the vulva is touched.

Does OB/GYN of Indiana treat incontinence?

For women over 40, Incontinence can be a fairly common problem. There are two types: Urinary and Fecal. Incontinence basically means loss of control of bowel movements or the urinary tract. This condition can be embarrassing, but often is treatable if you talk with your doctor.

Is it normal to bleed between periods?

If you find that you are bleeding outside of your normal menstruation period, then it could be a result of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding. This type of bleeding is usually caused by hormonal problems. Talk to your doctor.

My period has been different. What’s going on?

Your menstruation periods should be regular. If you notice something starting to change in your menstruation like heavier flow, prolonged menstruation periods, or if your cycle is happening at a much more frequent rate, you should contact your doctor and let them know what is going on.

What could be causing my pelvic pain?

Pelvic Pain happens to most women at some point in their life. The potential causes of pelvic pain are numerous: exaggerated bladder, pelvic girdle pain, or several different gynecologic and abdominal conditions.

Uterine Cancer

What are some warning signs for Uterine Cancer?

There are several types of Uterine Cancer. Generally speaking, lesions on the uterus appear and you experience abnormal vaginal bleeding with this form of cancer.

Yeast Infection

How can I treat a possible yeast infection during pregnancy?

If you think you have a yeast infection, call your physician before self-prescribing an over-the-counter treatment.

What over-the-counter medicine is the best to use for a yeast infection?

A number of over-the-counter antifungal medications for the treatment of vaginal yeast infections exist. The most common treatments are creams applied topically, such as Femstat 3, Lotrimin, Monistat, and Terazol 3. Your physician or pharmacist can assist your decision on which treatment works best for you.